Recognising the cultural heritage significance of Cottesloe Beach precinct.

The Cottesloe Beach Precinct has been in a constant state of evolution, with the first reference to the current suburb of Cottesloe originating through the subdivision of Crown land in 1896.

THE CHANGING NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY

The first refreshment stalls and bathing pavilions appeared on Cottesloe Beach in 1898, at which time the suburb become renown as a seaside resort which attracted a prestigious reputation.

The early 1900’s saw the construction of Cottesloe’s first jetty (1904), which was subsequently destroyed in storms and replaced by a jetty with promenade and rotunda in 1908.

By the following year, the first permanent refreshment rooms were opened, followed by the original Miss Donovan’s Indiana Teahouse in 1913.

During the remainder of the 1900’s to present day, numerous structures were built and destroyed to meet the changing needs of the community.

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The vision has been formed by the character, qualities and context of the Cottesloe Foreshore and the Indiana site.

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1908
Jetty and Rotunda
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1918
Miss Donovan’s Tea Rooms
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1929
Centenary Pavilion
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1983
Bathing Pavilion
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1996
Indiana Tea Rooms
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NOW

CREATING A NEW CHAPTER FOR INDIANA

Today Perth is a modern, vibrant city and we believe the time is right for Indiana to evolve once more to meet the needs of the community and play a more meaningful role in the lives of all Western Australians.

As custodians of this important place, we are committed to delivering this next chapter of Indiana in a manner consistent with our values and our commitment to creating meaningful places that connect.

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The iconic Indiana beach promenade, façade, towers, and archways are retained, with the building fabric sensitively adapted to suit the new compatible uses. Windows, balconies, and new levels are carefully incorporated into the existing building, enhancing usability, functionality, and amenity. New and improved public connections through the building allow people to engage with the heritage of Indiana in a new way.

The new elements are recognisable but complementary to the original building, ensuring the instantly recognisable Cottesloe and Western Australian landmark is enhanced and preserved for generations.